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Under embargo until 14 february 2011.

 

Press Release in English

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X-Rays show why van Gogh paintings lose their shine

Advanced X-ray analysis identifies chemical reaction responsible for darkening of Van Gogh paintings.

Bright yellow lead chromate becomes dull brown due to chromium reduction

 

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IllustrationD-klein.jpg

This illustration shows how X-Rays were used to study why van Gogh paintings lose their shine.

Top: a photo of the painting "Bank of the River Seine" on display at the van

Gogh Museum, divided in three and artificially coloured to simulate

a possible state in 1887 and 2050.

Bottom left: microscopic samples from art masterpieces moulded in plexiglass blocks.

Bottom right: X-ray microscope set-up at the ESRF with a sample block ready for a scan.

Centre: an image made using a high-resolution, analytical electron microscope

(EMAT – University of Antwerp) showing affected pigment grains,

and how the colour at their surface has changed due to reduction of chromium.

The scale bar indicates the size of these pigment grains.

Credit: ESRF/Antwerp University/Van Gogh Museum

 

Scientists have identified a complex chemical reaction responsible for the degradation of two paintings by Vincent van Gogh and other artists of the late 19th century. This discovery is a first step to understanding how to stop the bright yellow colours of van Gogh’s most famous paintings from being covered by a brown shade, and fading over time. In the meantime, the results suggest shielding affected paintings as much as possible from UV and sunlight. The results are published online on 14 February 2011 in the journal Analytical Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.

 

The work was carried out by an international team of scientists from four countries led by Koen Janssens of Antwerp University (Belgium), with Letizia Monico, an Italian chemist preparing a Ph.D. at Perugia University  (Italy) and Antwerp University, taking the centre stage in the experiments. As an Erasmus student, she worked for one year in Janssens’ research group in Antwerp, and is also the lead author of the two papers. Scientists from the CNR Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies (Perugia, Italy), the CNRS C2RMF (Paris, France), TU Delft (Netherlands) and the van Gogh Museum (Amsterdam, Netherlands) were also part of the team. Some of the samples were made available by RCE (formerly ICN), Netherlands.

 

Uncovering the secrets of the chemical reaction needed deployment of an impressive arsenal of analytical tools, with synchrotron X-rays at the ESRF in Grenoble (France) providing the final answers. “For every Italian, conservation of masterpieces has always mattered. I am pleased that science has now added a piece to a puzzle that is a big headache for so many museums” says Letizia Monico from University of Perugia.

 

The experiment reads like a crime scene investigation. The scientists employed an X-ray beam of microscopic dimensions to reveal a complex chemical reaction taking place in the incredibly thin layer where the paint meets the varnish. Sunlight can penetrate only a few micrometers into the paint, but over this short distance, it will trigger a hitherto unknown chemical reaction turning chrome yellow into brown pigments, altering the original composition.

 

Van Gogh’s decision to use novel bright colours in his paintings is a major milestone in the history of art. He deliberately chose colours that conveyed mood and emotion, rather than employing them realistically. At the time, this was completely unheard of and, without major innovations in pigment manufacturing made in the 19th century, would also have been impossible.

 

It was the vibrancy of new industrial pigments such as chrome yellow which allowed van Gogh to achieve the intensity of, for example, his series of Sunflowers paintings. He started to paint in these bright colours after leaving his native Holland for France where he became friends with artists who shared his new ideas about the use of colours. For one of them, Paul Gauguin, he started painting yellow sunflower motifs as a decoration for his bedroom.

 

The fact that  yellow chrome paint darkens under sunlight has been known since the early 19th Century. However, not all period paintings are affected, nor does it always happen at the same speed. As chrome yellow is toxic, artists quickly switched to new alternatives in the 1950s. However, Vincent van Gogh did not have this choice, and to preserve his work and that of many contemporaries, interest in the darkening of chrome yellow is now rising again.

 

To solve a chemical puzzle nearly 200 years old, the team around Janssens used a two-step approach: first, they collected samples from three left-over historic paint tubes. After these samples had been artificially aged for 500 hours using an UV-lamp, only one sample, from a paint tube belonging to the Flemish Fauvist Rik Wouters (1882-1913), showed significant darkening. Within 3 weeks, its surface of originally bright yellow had become chocolate brown. This sample was taken as the best candidate for having undergone the fatal chemical reaction, and sophisticated X-ray analysis identified the darkening of the top layer as linked to a reduction of the chromium in the chrome yellow from Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The scientists also reproduced Wouters’ chrome yellow paint and found that the darkening effect could be provoked by UV light.

 

In the second step, the scientists used the same methods to examine samples from affected areas of two van Gogh paintings, View of Arles with Irises (1888) and Bank of the Seine (1887), both on display in the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

 

This type of cutting edge research is crucial to advance our understanding of how paintings age and should be conserved for future generations”, says Ella Hendriks of the van Gogh Museum Amsterdam.

 

Because the affected areas in these multicoloured samples were even more difficult to locate than in the artificially aged ones, an impressive array of analytical tools had to be deployed which required the samples travelling to laboratories across Europe. The results indicate that the reduction reaction from Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is likely to also have taken place in the two van Gogh paintings.

 

The microscopic X-ray beam also showed that Cr(III) was especially prominent in the presence of chemical compounds which contained barium and sulphur. Based on this observation, the scientists speculate that van Gogh’s technique of blending white and yellow paint might be the cause of the darkening of his yellow paint.

 

Our next experiments are already in the pipeline. Obviously, we want to understand which conditions favour the reduction of chromium, and whether there is any hope to revert pigments to the original state in paintings where it is already taking place.”, summarises Koen Janssens from University of Antwerp.

 

 

Note to Editors: the crime scene investigation

 

The techniques used by the scientists in the preliminary phase included X-ray diffraction along with various spectroscopies employing infrared radiation, electrons and X-rays at the universities of Antwerp and Perugia, and at two synchrotrons (ESRF and DESY).

 

I am not aware of a similarly big effort ever having been made for the chemistry of an oil painting”, says Joris Dik, Professor at Delft Technical University.

 

In the decisive step, two techniques were combined using a single X-ray beam at the ESRF: X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). For the XRF, the microscopic beam size (0.9 x 0.25 µm²) made possible to separate the study of degraded and unaffected areas, and the XANES technique proved the speciation of chromium, i.e. the reduction from Cr(VI) to Cr(III).

 

"Our X-ray beam is one hundred times thinner than a human hair, and it reveals subtle chemical processes over equally minuscule areas. Making this possible has opened the door to a whole new world of discovery for art historians and conservators,” says Marine Cotte, an ESRF scientist also working at CNRS/Musée du Louvre.

 

The reduction of chromium that had been observed in the artificially aged sample from the atelier of Rik Wouters was finally confirmed in both microsamples from the van Gogh paintings.

 

The study was completed with a nanoscopic investigation of the discoloured paint using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) at the EMAT Centre of the University of Antwerp, which confirmed the results and showed that the newly formed Cr(III) compounds were formed as a nanometer-thin coating of the pigment particles that constitute the paint.

 

Reference: L. Monico et al., Degradation Process of Lead Chromate in Paintings by Vincent van Gogh Studied by Means of Synchrotron X-ray Spectromicroscopy and Related Methods. 1. Artificially Aged Model Samples and 2. Original Paint Layer Samples, Analytical Chemistry 15 February 2011.

 

Monico, Hendriks, Dik, Cotte and Janssens are authors of the paper. Monico is the lead author. The research was supported by the University of Perugia (Perugia, Italy), CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari CNR-ISTM (Perugia, Italy), Universiteit van Antwerpen (Antwerp, Belgium), Delft University of Technology (Delft, Netherlands), Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France, CNRS UMR171 (Paris, France), van Gogh Museum (Amsterdam, Netherlands),  and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF (Grenoble, France).

 

30 sec. animation of the investigation of the minuscule painting samples of the Van Gogh painting “Bank of The Seine”, V. Van Gogh (1887). (low resolution mp4 movie)


Click here to download (.MP4)

(6 MB, 600 x 450 pixels/frame)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France

30 sec. animation of the investigation of the minuscule painting samples of the Van Gogh painting “Bank of The Seine”, V. Van Gogh (1887). (high resolution mp4 movie)


Click here to download (.MP4)

(30 MB, 1200 x 900 pixels/frame)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

Reprint of "Degradation Process of Lead Chromate in Paintings by Vincent van Gogh Studied by Means of Synchrotron X-ray Spectromicroscopy and Related Methods. 1. Artificially Aged Model Samples",
by
Letizia Monico, Geert Van der Snickt, Koen Janssens, Wout De Nolf, Costanza Miliani, Johan Verbeeck, He Tian, Haiyan Tan, Joris Dik, Marie Radepont, and Marine Cotte,
Analytical Chemistry
83 (2011) 1214-1224,
doi 10.1021/ac102424h

Reprint of "Degradation Process of Lead Chromate in Paintings by Vincent van Gogh Studied by Means of Synchrotron X-ray Spectromicroscopy and Related Methods. 2. Original Paint Layer Samples",
by
Letizia Monico, Geert Van der Snickt, Koen Janssens, Wout De Nolf, Costanza Miliani, Marie Radepont, Ella Hendriks, Muriel Geldof, and Marine Cotte,
Analytical Chemistry
83 (2011) 1224-1231,
doi 10.1021/ac1025122

part1_page1_sm.png
Click here to download (.PDF)

(6 MB)

part1_page1_sm.png
Click here to download (.PDF)

(12 MB)

Published electronically on 14 February 2011, in print on 15 February 2011 by the American Chemical Society.
© ACS, USA

Anal. Chem. 2007 Impact factor: 5.3
Anal. Chem. 2007 Impact factor: 5.7
Anal. Chem. 2007 Impact factor: 5.2

analchemcover_150211_sm.jpg


© American Chemical Society, USA

High resolution photograph of Bank of the Seine (V. Van Gogh, 1887), one of the two paintings from which samples were investigated.

 

 

High resolution photograph of View of Arles with Irises (V. Van Gogh, 1888), one of the two paintings from which samples were investigated.

Bank_of_the_Seine_500x333.jpg
Click here to download (.JPG)

(1.4 MB, 3198 × 2133 pixels)

view_of_arles.jpg
Click here to download (.JPG)

(3 MB, 2520 ×2130 pixels)

sources: Flickr,  Wikipedia
© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, NL

Captioned version and corresponding animated sequence of simulated past, present and future aspect of ‘Bank of the Seine’ (V. Van Gogh, 1887)

Top: photo of th painting, divided in three and artificially coloured to simulate a possible state in 1887 (year of creation by Van Gogh)

and 2050.

Bottom left: microscopic samples from art masterpieces moulded in plexiglass blocks.

Bottom right: X-ray microscope set-up at the ESRF with a sample block ready for a scan.

Centre: high-resolution, analytical electron microscope image showing

affected pigment grains from the van Gogh painting.

Credit: ESRF/Antwerp University/Van Gogh Museum

Illustration-captioned.jpg
Click here to dow
nload (.JPG)
(3 MB, 3508 x 2416 pixels)
Click here to download (.MP4)
(1.4 MB, 640 x 360 pixels/frame)
Click here to download (.MP4)
(5.5 MB,1280 x 720 pixels/frame)

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France/University of Antwerp, Belgium/Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Uncaptioned version of simulated past, present and future aspect of ‘Bank of the Seine’ (V. Van Gogh, 1887)

Illustration-uncaptioned.jpg
Click here to dow
nload (.JPG)
(3 MB, 3508 x 2416 pixels)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

Microsamples from art masterpieces, embedded in Plexiglass plates, ready for investigation.

The two paint tubes contain historic yellow chrome paint are from the personal collection of M. Cotte.

Credit I. Montero/ESRF.

IPhoto-samples-close-up_sm.png
Click here to download (.JPG)
(6.4 MB, 5184 x 3456 pixels)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

This photo shows a plexiglass block with a micro sample mounted for investigation in the vacuum chamber of the synchrotron X-ray microscope. The small spot in the centre of the

plexiglass block is the sample, and the cylindrical tube connects it with the X-ray detector.

Credit I. Montero/ESRF

Photo-sample-detector_sm.png
Click here to download (.JPG)
(10.1 MB, 3314 x 5007 pixels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

Background: The vacuum chamber of the synchrotron X-ray microscope with the sample stage illuminated.

Foreground: Several microsamples from art masterpieces, moulded in Plexiglass plates ready for investigation.

 

Credit I. Montero/ESRF.

Photo-samples-ID21_sm.png
Click here to download (.JPG)
6.5 MB, 3324 x 4296 pixels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 © ESRF, Grenoble, France.

 

 

Conservation scientist Marine Cotte (F) at work in the control hutch of ESRF beamline ID21


Click here to download (.JPG)
(0.5 MB, 2409 x 1807 pixels)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

Optical photograph of yellow leadchromate/leadsulphate paint, obtained from a historical paint tube, belonging to the fauvist painter Rik Wouters, after being freshly applied on a microscope glass.

Credit: University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry.

Photo-paint-sample-detail.jpgClick here to download (.JPG)
(160 KB, 469 x 178 pixels)

 

 

 

© University of Antwerp, Belgium.

 

Optical photograph of originally yellow leadchromate/leadsulphate paint, obtained from a historical paint tube, belonging to the fauvist painter Rik Wouters, after being artificially aged under UV light during a period of 500 hours. Before the ageing, the paint was applied on a microscope glass.

Credit: University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry.

Photo-paint-sample-detail-aged.jpgClick here to download (.JPG)
(592 KB, 340 x 293 pixels)

 

 

© University of Antwerp, Belgium.

Artificial aging of chrome yellow paint taken from a historic paint tube, produced this

darkening effect within 500 hours of irradiation by UV light.

Credit: University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry.

Photo-paint-sample-detail-aged_sm.pngClick here to download (.JPG)
(120 KB, 1204 x 904 pixels)

 

 

 

© University of Antwerp, Belgium.

Optical microscope image of a  sample taken from “Bank of the

Seine” studied with synchrotron X-rays. The brown layer on top of the paint is varnish; while it appears opaque, in reality it lets light through. The brown pigments are invisible to the optical microscope. They are located at the interface between varnish and paint, in a layer less

than three micrometers thick. The scale bar at the bottom indicates the size of the sample.

Credit: University of Antwerp, Department of Chemistry.

Photo-micro-scample_sm.pngClick here to download (.JPG)
(70 KB, 1143 x 956 pixels)

 

 

 

 

© University of Antwerp, Belgium.

This photo shows an aerial view of the ESRF synchrotron in Grenoble, France. The outer

circumference of the ring building is close to 1 km. This houses the particle accelerator along

with 41 experimental stations.

 

Credit: ESRF.

Photo-ESRF-aerial_sm.jpgClick here to download (.JPG)
(2.0 MB, 3768 x 2466 pixels)

 

 

 

© ESRF, Grenoble, France.

This image contains original data from high-resolution, analytical electron microscopy which

shows the affected pigment grains of discoloured paint. Combined with electron energy loss

spectroscopy at the University of Antwerp, it showed that Cr(III) compounds were formed as

a nanometer-thin coating of the pigment particles that constitute the paint.

 

Credit: University of Antwerp, EMAT - Electron Microscopy for Materials Science

Image-STEM-pigments.jpgClick here to download (.JPG)
(120 KB, 566 x 774 pixels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© EMAT, University of Antwerp, Belgium.

STEM/EELS maps of chromium oxide (Cr2O3) and lead sulphate (PbSO4) obtained from one of the grains inside the brown alteration layer of sample A.

 

Credit: EMAT, University of Antwerp, Belgium

STEM_EELS_Map.pngClick here to download (.JPG)
(224 KB, 317 x 307 pixels)

 

Cr2O3   

PbSO4

 

© EMAT, University of Antwerp, Belgium.

 

 

Media contacts:

 

ESRF, Claus Habfast, claus.habfast@esrf.fr +33 4 7688 2128 and +33 666 662 384

University of Antwerp, Peter de Meyer, Peter.DeMeyer@ua.ac.be +32 3 265 47 11

CNR, Marco Ferrazzoli, marco.ferrazzoli@cnr.it +39 06 4993 3383 

CNRS, Laetitia Louis-Hommani, presse@cnrs-dir.fr +33 1 44 96 51 37

TU Delft, Michel van Baal, , M.vanBaal@tudelft.nl +31 15 278 5454

Van Gogh Museum, Janine Fluyt, Fluyt@vangoghmuseum.nl,  +31 20 57 05 221

 

Science contacts:

 

University of Antwerp,

      Prof. Koen Janssens, koen.janssens@ua.ac.be; Dr. Jo Verbeeck, jo.verbeeck@ua.ac.be

University of Perugia & CNR,

      Prof. Costanza Miliani, miliani@thch.unipg.it, Letizia Monico, letizia.monico@gmail.com

TU Delft,

      Prof. Joris Dik, j.dik@tudelft.nl

Van Gogh Museum & RCE,

      Dr. Ella Hendriks, hendriks@vangoghmuseum.nl; Dr. Muriel Geldof, M.Geldof@cultureelerfgoed.nl

ESRF & CNRS,

      Dr. Marine Cotte, marine.cotte@esrf.fr

 

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1 August 2008

PRESS RELEASE - Persbericht in het Nederlands

 

Looking through Van Gogh

Advanced X-ray analysis reveals a portrait below the painting of a landscape

Behind this painting is the portrait of a woman.

 

 

It is well-known that Vincent van Gogh often painted over his older works. Experts estimate that about thirty percent of his paintings conceal other compositions under them. A new technique, based on synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, reveals this type of hidden painting.

The techniques usually employed to reveal concealed layers of paintings, such as conventional X-ray radiography and Infra-red reflectography, have their limitations. Together with experts from the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg and the Kröller-Müller Museum, TU Delft materials expert and art historian Dr Joris Dik and University of Antwerp chemistry professor Koen Janssens therefore chose to adopt a different approach. The painting is subjected to an X-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source, and the fluorescence of the layers of paint is measured. This technique has the major advantage that the measured fluorescence is specific to each chemical element. Each type of atom (e.g. lead or mercury) and also individual paint pigments can therefore be charted individually. The benefit of using synchrotron radiation of high energy is that it is strongly penetrating so that element specific analysis well below the visible surface becomes possible. The upper layers of paint distort the measurements only to a small degree. Moreover, the speed of measurement is high, which allows relatively large areas to be visualised.


Patch of Grass

This method was applied to a painting by Vincent van Gogh. The work in question, Grasgrond, was painted by Van Gogh in Paris in 1887 and is owned by the Kröller-Müller Museum (Otterlo, The Netherlands). Previous research had already discovered the vague outline of a head behind the painting. It was scanned at the synchrotron radiation source DORIS at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY in Hamburg using an intense but small X-ray beam. Over the course of two days, the area covering the image of a woman's head was scanned, measuring 17.5 x 17.5 cm.

 

 

The measurements enabled researchers to reconstruct the concealed painting in unparalleled detail. In particular the combination of the distribution of the elements mercury and antimony (from specific paint pigments) provided a ‘colour photo’ of the portrait which had been painted over.
The reconstruction enables art historians to understand the evolution of Van Gogh's work better. The applied technique is expected to pave the way for research into many other concealed paintings.

Additional investigations performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF, Grenoble) revealed the presence of the pigments Naples' Yellow (lead antimonate, yellow-brown) and Vermillion (mercury sulphide, red), employed by Van Gogh to paint the portrait.

 

 

3 min. presentation by art historian Joris Dik summarizing the examination results (low resolution Quicktime movie)


Click here to download (.MOV)

(10 MB, 600 x 450 pixels/frame)

 

 

 

© TU Delft, NL

3 min. presentation by art historian Joris Dik summarizing the examination results (high resolution Quicktime movie)


Click here to download (.MOV)

(140 MB, 1200 x 900 pixels/frame)

 

 

 

© TU Delft, NL

Reprint of "Visualization of a Lost Painting by Vincent van Gogh Using Synchrotron Radiation Based X-ray Fluorescence Elemental Mapping",
by
Joris Dik, Koen Janssens, Geert Van Der Snickt, Luuk van der Loeff, Karen Rickers and Marine Cotte,
Analytical Chemistry
80 (2008) 6436–6442,
doi 10.1021/ac800965g

(Available free of charge, courtesy of the American Chemical Society).


Click here to download (.PDF)

(3 MB)


Cover illustration of 15 August 2008 hard copy of Analytical Chemistry.

 

 

 

 

 

Published electronically on 30 July 2008, in print on 15 August 2008 by the American Chemical Society.
© ACS, USA

Anal. Chem. 2005 Impact factor: 5.6;
Anal. Chem. 2006 Impact factor: 5.6; Anal. Chem. 2007 Impact factor: 5.3.

 





© ACS, USA

High resolution photograph of Patch of Grass


Click here to download (.JPG)

(2 MB, 1642 × 1280 pixels)

source: Wikipedia
© Kröller-Müller Museum, NL

Analytical chemist Koen Janssens (B) adjusting the alignment of the painting in the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer at beamline L of the DORIS synchrotron facility, Hamburg


Click here to dow
nload (.JPG)
(6 MB, 4256 x 2832 pixels)
Click here to download (.AVI)
(61 MB, 720 x 576 pixels/frame)

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

© DESY Hamburg, D

Conservators Luuk Van der Loeff (NL, left) and Geert Van der Snickt (B) discussing the results


Click here to download (.JPG)

(5 MB, 4256 x 2832 pixels)

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

Happy faces at the end of a succesful experiment at the Hamburg synchrotron
Left to right: Koen Janssens (B), Joris Dik (NL), Rinus van Beek (NL), Luuk Van der Loeff (NL), Karin Rickers (D), Geert Van der Snickt (B)


Click here to download (.JPG)
(6 MB, (4256 x 2832 pixels)

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

 

 

 

Conservation scientist Marine Cotte (F) at work in the control hutch of ESRF beamline ID21


Click here to download (.JPG)
(0.5 MB, 2409 x 1807pixels)

 

 

 

© ESRF Grenoble, F

 

 

 

 

 

 

Painting conservator Luuk van der Loeff (NL) removing the painting from the scanning stage at the end of the experiment.


Click here to download (.AVI)

(72 MB, 720 x 576 pixels)

Click here to download (.AVI)

(63 MB, 720 x 576 pixels)

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

 

 

 

 

 

Conventional transmission X-ray radiograph combined with the X-ray fluorescence 'color photo'


Click here to download (.JPG)
(33 KB, 336 x 424 pixels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

© KMM Otterlo, NL

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is it a landscape ? It's also a portrait !


Click here to download (.JPG)

(0.7 MB, 903 x 1160 pixels)

 

 

 

 

 

 

© DESY Hamburg, D

 

Press release by TU Delft, NL
Press release of Kröller-Müller Museum, NL
Press release by DESY, Hamburg, D including additional images

Contact information

Office phone

Mobile phone

Dr. Joris Dik, Technical University of Delft (NL)

+31 152 789 571

+31 624 806 855

Prof. Koen Janssens, University of Antwerp (B)

+32 3 820 2373

+32 474 465 532

Geert Van der Snickt, University of Antwerp (B)

+32 3 820 2363

+32 494 624 473

Luuk Van der Loeff, Kröller-Müller Museum (NL)

+31 318 596 161

+31 612 509 778

Dr. Karin Rickers, Hamburger Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (D)

+49 408 998 2930

Dr. Marine Cotte, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (F)

+33 476 882 127

 

 

 


Links to Reactions in worldwide press and media (30 July - 2 August 2008)

 

In the morning of 31 July 2008, the "Hidden Van Gogh revealed" news story was featured as one of the central items on the main page of Yahoo. Among the list of "Most view photo's" on that day were 3 pictures from the scanning experiment.

 

Both synchrotron facilities at which the investigations took place,
placed the item on their main websites.



The press release was also posted on lightsources.org, the joint internet portal of all synchrotron sources.

Articles in the general press. Click on a logo to follow the corresponding link.

2 early articles (30 July 2008) in the Flemish press
(.PDF, in Dutch)

TV coverage (30 July 2008) in Belgium (VTM)
Interview with K. Janssens (Univ. of Antwerp)
(23 MB, .MOV, in Dutch)

TV coverage (30 July 2008) in Belgium(ATV)
Interview with K. Janssens (Univ. of Antwerp)
(13 MB, .MOV, in Dutch)

TV coverage (30 July 2008) in The Netherlands (NOS)
Interview with J. Dik (TUDelft) and L. Van der Loeff
(Kröller-Müller Museum) (8 MB, .MOV, in Dutch)

TV coverage (30 July 2008) in The Netherlands (RTL4)
Interview with J. Dik (TUDelft) and L. Jansen (Van Gogh Museum Amsterdam) (28 MB, .MOV, in Dutch)

Listen to a France-Info radio interview
with Marine Cotte and Joris Dik

('Un Van Gogh peut en cacher un autre', 31 July 2008,
in French)

TV coverage (2 August 2008) in Japan
(0.8 MB, .MOV, in Japanese)

Listen to an NPR radio interview with Koen Janssens or
Watch an NPR video with commentary by Joris Dik

(both from 'All Things Considered', 2 August 2008,
in English)

Listen to a Radio Suisse Romande interview
with Marine Cotte

('Le tableau caché de Van Gogh', 2 September 2008,
in French)

TV coverage (11 September 2008) in Germany (RTL Nord)
"Das Rätsel der versteckter Bilder von Vincent Van Gogh"
with J. Dik (TUDelft) and L. Van der Loeff (Kröller-Müller Museum
),
K. Rickers, W. Drube (DESY) and K. Janssens (UAntwerp)
(52 MB, .MOV, in German)






+ the opinion of several Dutch art experts (in Dutch)













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Click here for a more complete list (up to 3 August 2008, 2 pm), compiled by W. Drube, DESY.

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counter reached 10000 hits on 2 August 2008, 20000 on 4 August 2008;

64500 on 14 february 2011)
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